Tai Tzu-ying won Badminton Title

Taiwanese badminton player Tai Tzu-ying 戴資穎 won the Celcom Axiata Malaysia Open in women’s singles in Kuala Lumpur on April 9 in the final matches (2-1) against Spanish opponent Carolina Marin. Marin won the first game before giving way to Tai in the following two. This is Tai’s fourth successive World Superseries win (after Yonex All England Open 2017, Dubai World Superseries Finals 2016, and Yonex Sunrise Hong Kong Open 2016). Tai, 22, has been ranked as no. 1 in the Badminton World Federation world rankings for women’s singles since December 2016.

In men’s singles, Chou Tien-chen, currently ranked no. 7, was eliminated in round 2 against Indonesian player Jonatan Christie.

Taiwanese activist abducted in China

Update (4/10): Lee Ching-yu was denied boarding today at Taoyuan International Airport after the airlines received notification from the Chinese public security ministry that her Mainland Travel Permit has been cancelled.

Taiwanese human rights activist Lee Ming-che was reported missing on March 19 after entering the southern Chinese city of Zhuhai from Macau by land. His wife was notified after he failed to meet a friend for a meeting the same day. China’s Taiwan Affairs Office confirmed on March 29 that Lee has been detained and is under investigation on suspicion of harming national security. Chinese authorities have so far refused to release where Lee is being held and when he is expected to be released.

Lee, 42, works at Wenshan Community College in Taipei and frequently travels to China. He has extensive contacts with NGO workers in China and is critical of how human rights lawyers are being treated in China. Lee’s wife, Lee Ching-yu, is planning on traveling to Beijing on April 10 to seek her husband’s release from relevant authorities.

Constitutional Court heard debate on same-sex marriage

Taiwan’s Constitutional Court today heard a case brought by LGBT activist Chi Chia-wei and Taipei City Government on whether the Article 972 of the Civil Code, which states marriage as between “the male and the female parties,” is unconstitutional.

ROC Constitution, Article 7: All citizens of the Republic of China, irrespective of sex, religion, race, class, or party affiliation, shall be equal before the law.

The high court heard oral arguments from attorneys representing the petitioners as well as from the justice minister, representative from the interior ministry, and representative from the Chi’s local household registration office. Six expert witnesses, all constitutional law experts, were also selected by the 14-member court to offer their opinions on the case (one of the 15 justices recused himself). The petitioners believe that same-sex marriage should be included in the Civil Code, while the justice ministry believes that a separate law for civil partnership is more appropriate until further consensus among Taiwanese people on the issue is reached. Continue reading “Constitutional Court heard debate on same-sex marriage”

Chinese, Taiwanese, or Chinese Taiwanese?

There are many factors that play into how Chinese and American people see their identities. Chinese people pride themselves on being a civilization with 5,000 years of history, and hence everyone who is born into a Chinese family, no matter the geographic location, is obliged to always identify him or herself as Chinese. Otherwise it’s a dishonor to the family and what have you.

On the other hand, other than the Native Americans, the U.S. is a country of immigrants, who left their home countries in hope of finding a better life in the states. They may retain the cultural heritage of their country of origin, but they and their descendants primarily identify themselves as Americans (e.g. Asian American, African American, European American, etc.). Continue reading “Chinese, Taiwanese, or Chinese Taiwanese?”

The polite fiction of “one China”

The great obfuscation of one-China published by The Economist is an excellent, though introductory, read on the Taiwan-China-U.S. relations. Some key points from the article:

China itself does not actually have a one-China policy. It has what it calls a one-China principle, which is that there is only one China, with its government in Beijing.

America does not accept the one-China principle. Instead it has the one-China policy, which acknowledges that China has such a principle—not quite the same thing. America does not recognise Chinese sovereignty over Taiwan, nor does it recognise Taiwan as an independent state.

In Taiwan itself the one-China formula has an even stranger history. It is rooted in the fiction that the island’s first president, Chiang Kai-shek, who fled there in 1949 after losing a civil war to Mao Zedong’s communists, would one day recapture the whole of China.

Among [the proportion of] people [on the island] between 20 and 30, 85% say they are Taiwanese.

The simple and natural solution is to admit there are two Chinas.

A more detailed analysis on the historical progression of “one China”: The “one China” of the U.S. is not the same as the “one China” of China (in Chinese).

Oil spill covers Green Island shore

Seashore of Green Island off Taiwan’s southeastern coast was found covered in heavy waste oil on March 10. A local resident first posted about the spill on Facebook, prompting the government to rush to contain and clean up the waster oil. The oil appeared to have been illegally dumped north of Green Island by a large vessel.

Environmental Protection Administration official estimates today that the clean up will take a week to complete, while a vessel has been identified as possibly responsible for the spill. EPA and foreign ministry officials have not named the ship company nor its nationality.